When the organ rocks and revels

When the organ rocks and revels

It’s showtime in five minutes, but music producer, organist and choir director patrick glaser is as relaxed as ever. On this sunday, the protestant town church in kitzingen is already so full of people that the church is usually only seen on high holidays, but the man from ohringen, sitting on the bench in the organ loft, has not even noticed yet. Full house at the first concert of the music year – cantor carl-friedrich meyet is also pleased, who buries the audience together with glaser a little later at "orgel rockt. Glaser will now play classics of rock and film history, he explains to the visitors. And a few moments later, an unusual musical journey begins with vangelis’ "conquest of paradise".

The organ is widely known as the "queen of instruments". Why it has this status is partly due to its coarseness, but also because of the wide range of sounds that make the instrument something special. This becomes all the more clear on this sunday, as one is familiar with most of the pieces that patrick glaser intones during the one-and-a-half-hour concert. There the "phantom of the opera" murmurs darkly into the church nave, afterwards the organist lets the "angels" of robbie williams fly and lets the rhythm of the (imitated) guitars of the metal band knorkator stomp in their "children’s song".

It is a dream that patrick glaser has fulfilled with his concert tour, which has now lasted for three years, he explains. The idea was born out of necessity when the musician was asked to perform an organ concert in his home parish a few years ago, but was unable to put together the necessary repertoire of classical pieces at first go. But he could imagine playing rock melodies on the organ, he told the pastor at the time, and was surprised when he immediately agreed to the idea. Even more, when his concert was full with several hundred people. Since then, more than 15,000 people have listened to glaser’s arrangements.

James bond lets dig on "live and let die" (paul mccartney), as if made for it seems the solemn "all you need is love" by the beatles, and on gerry rafferty’s "baker street" you don’t even miss the characteristic saxophone. Patrick glaser moderates his program, explaining to the audience what he has just played, in case one of them has not yet come to his senses. And the freelance music and sound producer and composer with a focus on audio marketing also intones his own pieces. Including the film music "schlagbaume" and the chorale "spirits.

Standing ovations are the thanks after a driving concert, to which glaser adds one more encore: "nothing else matters", the classic ballad by metallica, convinces with its steadily building dynamics. The audience is enthusiastic, the artist too. And last but not least, the church community is also happy: part of the proceeds, which are thrown into the offering baskets at the end, will be used for the upcoming renovation of the organ.